Transforming Yesterday’s Postsecondary System to Better Serve Today’s Students

Leanne Davis, Insights & Outlooks

“A college degree is a proven pathway to a higher median-income level and improved social mobility for students, especially those from low-income backgrounds, and for greater equity for society as a whole. Yet many students who enroll in college do not finish; across the United States, there are 36 million adults–or approximately 10% of the country’s population as a whole–who have completed some college, but did not earn a degree.”

Read more. 

 

4 Reasons Why Students Don’t Receive the Degrees They’ve Earned

Rachel Koenig, EdSurge

“Millions of Americans have earned some college credit but no degree. Some experts think institutions of higher education—not former students—are partly to blame. Through Degrees When Due, a project of the Institute for Higher Education Policy, nearly 200 two- and four-year colleges are digging through data and auditing administrative policies to figure out how many such students they’ve lost, and why.”

Read more.

 

Some College, No Degree Report Release Highlights

National Student Clearinghouse Research Center

“The United States saw nearly one million Some College, No Degree students in just five years who, against all the odds, found their way back into postsecondary education and worked their way through to ultimately earn their first undergraduate credential. This report tells a story of success and points the way to further success.”

Read more.

 

Degrees When Due Initiative Seeks to Increase Degree Completion for Adults with “Some College, No Degree”

Leanne Davis, ACCT Perspectives

“Earning a college degree leads to a higher median income level and improved social mobility for students, especially those from low-income backgrounds. Yet many students who enroll in college do not finish – there are nearly four million students who have completed at least two years of college coursework and yet have no degree to show for it.”

Read more.

 

Crossing the Finish Line: Research to Re-Engage and Support Students with Some College, No Degree

Jason Taylor, Insights & Outlooks

“Millions of our nation’s students have accumulated significant college credit but have no credential to recognize their hard work. Roughly 4 million of these students are considered near-completers, meaning they have completed at least two years of coursework—often enough to earn an associate’s degree.”

Read more.